VHF/UHF Weak Signal Page


Current 144 MHz Band Conditions (Click for Details)
WWV Alert Message Data from DXRobot
144 Es in N.A. Aurora 144 Es in Europe Today's MUF & Es
Status Status Status Status
The "Today's MUF / Es" shows the daily 144MHz High MUF MUF and Es MUF times. The blue bar MUF indicates 50MHz Es and the green bar MUF indicates 70MHz Es times. The graphic is updated every 5 minutes.
Last 100 Spots on 50 MHz (And other bands)
ON4KST 50 MHz Chat (And other bands)


VUCC Totals



This is a list of my VHF/UHF Century Club Program (VUCC) totals.

AwardWorkedLabelQSL sentConfirmedSubmitCheckedTotalTot Conf
6m..19215..234215
4m........
2m...1..11
1.25m........
70cm........
Sat........
Band Total..19216..235216


Solar-Terrestrial Data
Solar-Terrestrial Data


Click Here For Solar Indices by Month Since 1991

G4FON G4FON - Koch Method CW Trainer - Software Download

F6FVY - Find Your Grid Square on a Map

I have always had an interest in the VHF/UHF Weak Signal segment of our Ham Radio hobby. Back in my younger days I worked a lot of 50 MHz, 144 MHz, 220 MHz, and 432 MHz. I worked some EME (Earth-Moon-Earth, or Moon Bounce) during those days back in the 70's and early 80's. You may ask what do I mean by "VHF/UHF Weak Signal"? What I am talking about is mainly working in the CW and SSB segments of these bands over great distances or running EME. I worked satellites during those times, also. I had several great mentors in the VHF/UHF Weak Signal arena. George Chaney, W5JTL (SK) of Vicksburg, MS; Rex Turner, W5RCI (SK) of Marks, MS; Paul Wilson, W4HHK (SK) of Collierville, TN; and George Tew, NC5Y (SK) of Jackson, MS were my mentors in this area of our hobby. You can read about them on my "Mentors" page.

George Chaney, Rex, and I would talk every morning and every night. We would normally get on around six in the morning and at eight at night. We would talk about construction or antenna projects we were working on. Back in those days I had stepped up to a Kenwood TS-700S. This was the 10 watt all mode 2 meter transceiver. When trying to work contests or distant weak signal stations I had a pair of 4CX250B's that could be easily driven by this rig. I remember one Sunday night George Chaney and I were talking to each other. I was running about 3 watts and had my beam pointed towards Vicksburg. After awhile, a station broke in and asked where we were. George went back to him and told him and he replied, that he was a WA2 in Poughkeepsie, NY. For the next hour or so, the lower end of 144 MHz sounded like 20 meters during the CQWW DX Contest! That was some of the best fun I ever had. I worked tons of new states and grids that night and if it were not for all the QRM on the bands, I could have worked even more. I never turned my antenna and never flipped on the amp!


Hepburn Tropo Index Map:


HF 10 Meter (28 MHz) Propagation Map:

This map uses 10 meter spots to compile it’s 28 MHz propagation map. It is real time, but you must manually Refresh this page. Click on the map and the spots with the callsigns will be listed and is clickable. Click on the callsign for their detailed information. Distance is measured in kilometers.

DXMAPS Real Time 28 MHz Propagation Map


VHF(50 MHz) Propagation Map:

This map uses 6 meter spots to compile it’s 50 MHz propagation map. It is real time, but you must manually Refresh this page. Click on the map and the spots with the callsigns will be listed and is clickable. Click on the callsign for their detailed information. Distance is measured in kilometers.

DXMAPS Real Time 50 MHz Propagation Map


VHF(70 MHz) Propagation Map:

This map uses 4 meter spots to compile it’s 70 MHz propagation map. It is real time, but you must manually Refresh this page. Click on the map and the spots with the callsigns will be listed and is clickable. Click on the callsign for their detailed information. Distance is measured in kilometers.

DXMAPS Real Time 70 MHz Propagation Map


VHF(144 MHz) Propagation Map:

This map uses APRS data to compile it’s 144 MHz propagation. It is real time, but you must manually Refresh this page. You must Zoom in for more detail. Look for yellow and red areas and hover over them to display the callsigns. Click on the callsign for their detailed information. Distance is measured in kilometers.

NG0E VHF APRS Propagation Map

DXMAPS Real Time 144 MHz Propagation Map


VHF(222 MHz) Propagation Map:

This map uses 1.25 meter spots to compile it’s 222 MHz propagation map. It is real time, but you must manually Refresh this page. Click on the map and the spots with the callsigns will be listed and is clickable. Click on the callsign for their detailed information. Distance is measured in kilometers.

DXMAPS Real Time 222 MHz Propagation Map


UHF(432 MHz) Propagation Map:

This map uses 70 centimeter spots to compile it’s 432 MHz propagation map. It is real time, but you must manually Refresh this page. Click on the map and the spots with the callsigns will be listed and is clickable. Click on the callsign for their detailed information. Distance is measured in kilometers.

DXMAPS Real Time 432 MHz Propagation Map


(SHF) Above 450 MHz Propagation Map:

This map uses Super High Frequency UHF/Microwave spots to compile it’s this propagation map. It is real time, but you must manually Refresh this page. Click on the map and the spots with the callsigns will be listed and is clickable. Click on the callsign for their detailed information. Distance is measured in kilometers.

DXMAPS Real Time SHF (Above 450 MHz) Propagation Map


VHF/UHF Propagation Modes:

VHF and UHF are not thought to be bands where propagation affects your signal, but there are times when your signal will propagate well beyond their normal limits. VHF/UHF "Openings" happen sporatically and you cannot predict them as well as HF propagation. VHF and UHF can be affected by the following conditions, though:

Tropo - Tropospheric signals happen in the part of the atmosphere close to the surface and up to about 25,000 feet or 7,620 meters. Such signals are thus directly affected by weather systems up to several hundred miles. A major storm system or a cold front that is approaching can create Tropo openings. As it cools in the evenings it can create Tropo openings, as it is in the morning when the inverse happens, cool to warm conditions. When it is very warm and there is a high pressure system with cloudless and windless skies, Tropo will improve weak signals from distant stations. Another symptom of Tropo conditions is when adjacent TV stations on the same channel start to interfere with each other. Summer and Fall are the best times for Tropo openings and UHF signals can be enhance to distances up to about 1,000 miles or 1,600 kilometers or more for single hops. At sunset the upper air and surface air cool at different rates causing a temperature inversion. A similar effect happens at sunrise. Normally VHF/UHF signals travel into space but the inversion effectively reduces sky wave radiation from a transmitter. With temperature inversion the signal is refracted over the horizon rather than continuing into outer space. Fog also produces Tropo openings. The heating of the upper level of the fog causes a temperature inversion. It occurs in the evening an continues overnight and clears at sunrise over a period of around 4 - 5 hours.

Sporadic E - Sporatic E is an unusual form of radio propagation using characteristics of the Earth's Ionosphere. Whereas most forms of skywave propagation use the normal and cyclic ionization properties of the ionosphere's F region to refract or bend radio signals back toward the Earth's surface, Sporadic E propagation bounces signals off smaller "clouds" of unusually ionized atmospheric gas in the lower E region that is located at altitudes of approximately 55 to 100 miles or 90 to 160 km. This occasionally allows for long-distance communication at VHF frequencies not usually well-suited to such communication. Sporadic E occurs during June-July and early August and again in December and January. As the name suggests this condition is very sporadic and learn how to be patient in your waiting for it to occur.

Aurora - The Northern Lights or Aurora Borealis occurs in the northern parts of Canada and can also be seen from northern United States, Europe, and Asia. The Southern Lights or Aurora Australis happen in high southern latitudes in Antarctica, Australia, New Zealand, and South Ameriaca. Aurora is caused by a solar storm or Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) that hits the Earth's Magnetosphere and can have an effect on radio propagation. If can affect VHF and UHF propagation in a positive manner and HF propagation in a negative manner. To use the aurora you should point your antenna north to work a station to the south as signals bounce back from the aurora in the Northern Hemisphere and the opposite in the Southern Hemisphere.


Click link on contest below to see current year dates/times/rules.

VHF+ Contest Calendar
NameMonth
WASH 2m Simplex ContestJanuary
ARRL January VHF ContestJanuary
CSVHFS Spring 2m SprintApril
CSVHFS Spring 222 SprintApril
CSVHFS Spring 432 SprintApril
CSVHFS Spring Microwave Sprint
(903 MHz and above)
May
CSVHFS Spring 6m sprintMay
Maritime QSO PartyJune
ARRL June VHF ContestJune
SMIRK 6m ContestJune
IARU Region 1 50 MHz ContestJune
CQ Worldwide VHF ContestJuly
NJ QSO PartyJuly
ARRL UHF ContestAugust
SEVHFS Fall 6m SprintAugust
ARRL September VHF ContestSeptember
SEVHFS Fall 2m SprintSeptember
SEVHFS Fall 222 SprintSeptember
SEVHFS Fall microwave Sprint
(903 MHz and above)
September
SEVHFS Fall 432 SprintOctober
PA QSO PartyOctober
NY State QSO PartyOctober
RAC Canada Winter ContestDecember



2 Meter SSB Nets and Groups
NameTimeFrequency
The 205 Morning Group8 AM Eastern daily144.205 Northeast US
Beam Spinners8 AM local daily144.200
Sun - WA7KYM DN71
Mon-Wed & Sat - KG0OR  DM79
Fri - K0OJ   DN70
Northern Lights Radio SocietySunday 9 PM CST144.260
KA0PQW EN33
Lowcountry DigitalSunday 8:30 PM Eastern
Wednesday 8 PM Eastern
145.700
KH6TY FM02
Western States Weak Signal Society - Disbanded as of January 2007Sunday 5:30 Pacific144.200
K6TSK DM03
N8DEZ DM04
Pacific Northwest VHF SocietySunday 8 AM local
Tuesday 8 PM local
144.240
ECVHFSSunday 10:30 AM Eastern144.250
K2SMN FN20
St. PeteSunday 8:15 PM Eastern144.210
WA4GCH EL87
Roadrunners Microwave GroupSunday 9 PM Central144.150
K5LLL EM10
Packrats8 PM Eastern144.150
N3ITT FN20
N0PBMonday 8 PM Central144.250
N0PB EM39
Florida SSBMonday 7 PM Eastern144.210
WA4JWU EL98
Rocky Mountain VHFMonday 8 PM local144.220
W0EDW DN70
K0MLM DN70
Upper Rio GrandeMonday 8 PM local144.250
NM5F DM65
Guelph (Ontario)Monday 9 PM Eastern
Wednesday 9 PM Eastern
144.245
VE3XTM EN93
San DiegoTuesday 7 PM local144.230
W6IPT DM13
Mud ToadsTuesday 8:30 PM local144.175
N4RZP FM17
W5VHFMonday 8 PM Local144.190
KD5ZVE EM26
K5SW EM25
North GAMonday 8 PM Eastern144.210
W4TMW EM84
QuebecTuesday 8 PM Eastern144.240
VE2JWH FN35
VE2DC FN35
AM NostalgiaTuesday 7 PM Central144.950
KC9CUK EN52
Deep South Texas SWOTTuesday 9 PM Central144.250
N5SSH EL07
The 144.240 NetWednesday 8 PM CDT
(7 PM CST)
144.240
WB9LYH EN54
The 144.252 NetMonday 8:30 PM Eastern144.252
K8TQK EM89
North Texas SWOTWednesday 9 PM Central144.250
W5FKN EM13
SWOT NetThursday 8 PM Central144.250
K5YG EM50
OK SWOTThursday 8 PM Central144.250
KD5ZVE EM26
SE Ohio SWOTThursday 8 PM Eastern144.250
AB8XG EM89
KD8DJE EM89
Q5 netThursday 7 PM Central144.220
N9JBW EN61
Northeast Weak Signal netThursday 8:30 PM Eastern144.250
W1COT FN31
Atlantic SSBFriday 8:30 PM Eastern144.240
WB4IXU EM86
Chicago-OhioFriday 7 PM Central144.215
KD8IME EN71
ChesapeakeSaturday 9:30 PM Eastern144.205
W3BFC FM18
Atlantic Coast 2m SSB NetSunday 8:30 PM Eastern144.230
N5PIP EL96
Central Texas 2m SSB Operating EventThursday 9:00 PM Central144.250
NE5B EM10
2m Road Runner Microwave Group NetSunday 9:00 PM Central144.150
K5RMG EM10

VHF/UHF Clubs:

VHF/UHF Resources: